PINDROP BLOG

October 16 – The Week in Phone Fraud

TWIPF2 This week in phone fraud, flood-related phone fraud in South Carolina and hacking phone voice commands.

This week, South Carolina officials are warning residents to beware phone scams targeting victims of the recent record-breaking flooding that hit the area. Residents are warning of phony charity scams as well as criminals impersonating utilities or officials offering flood relief grants.

Siri may be your personal assistant. But your voice is not the only one she listens to. Wired reports that a group of French researchers have discovered Siri also helpfully obeys the orders of any hacker who talks to her—even, in some cases, one who’s silently transmitting those commands via radio from as far as 16 feet away.

newsletter-banner

Atlanta Business Chronicle: Georgia looks to cybersecurity execs for industry growth strategies – Georgia lawmakers are looking to the growing number of cybersecurity companies setting up shop in metro Atlanta for ideas on how to further expand the industry’s presence in the Peach State. Metro Atlanta is a natural fit for cybersecurity.

Let’s Talk Payments: How Banks Are Joining Hands With FinTech Firms to Serve Customers – As traditional banking giants and innovative FinTech startups develop an understanding of the common goal of serving the customer in the best way possible, more and more collaborations will be found among both the parties.

Detroit Free Press: Scam artists dial for dollars by threatening jail time – Consumers need to realize that scammers can even find it easier to phone you to con you than it is to scam you via e-mail. After all, spam filters catch more of the phony e-mails before they even reach consumers.

Wired: Hackers Can Silently Control Siri From 16 Feet Away – Siri may be your personal assistant. But your voice is not the only one she listens to. As a group of French researchers have discovered, Siri also helpfully obeys the orders of any hacker who talks to her—even, in some cases, one who’s silently transmitting those commands via radio from as far as 16 feet away.

KENS5: USAA tracing phone scam artist – USAA allowed KENS 5 into their Cyber Threat Operations Center. USAA and the FBI are scrambling to the trace the predator. Basically, it’s called a robocall, said Tom Shaw, USAA’s vice president of financial crimes management.

Krebs on Security: Hacker Who Sent Me Heroin Faces Charges in U.S. – Fly’s plan was simple: Have the drugs delivered to my home in my name, and then spoof a call from one of my neighbors to the local police informing them that I was a druggie, and that I was even having drugs delivered to my home.

Baseline Magazine: On the Frontier of Malware Research – About 1 in 3,000 calls to a financial call center originate from professional criminals attempting to commit fraud. Researchers claim this tool catches 90 percent of these crooks. This audio fingerprinting technology verifies the identity of callers.

The Verge: Connecticut man gets year in prison for ‘swatting’ hoaxes – “Swatting is not a schoolboy prank, it’s a federal crime. It is our hope that the knowledge that this defendant will serve time in prison and live with a felony conviction will deter others from engaging in this immature, dangerous and criminal behavior.”

The Post and Courier: From flood-damaged cars to phony charities and phone scams, beware flood-related fraud – Somehow you’re due to get some money, maybe a federal flood relief grant you didn’t apply for, and all you have to do pay a processing fee. Never give money to anyone who calls you asking for it, particularly if they claim to be with the government.